Top 10 Books that You Must Read

If you love reading, here’s a perfect reading list for you. Even if you aren’t so much into reading, here’re 10 reasons to love reading. Everyone should read at least once for these 10 books — This books are in order to human life cycle. some are well known classics, others are modern giants. 

Man's Search for Meaning

LMan’s Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, and describing his psychotherapeutic method, which involved identifying a purpose in life to feel positive about, and then immersively imagining that outcome.

The Art Of Happiness

The Art of Happiness (Riverhead, 1998, ISBN 1-57322-111-2) is a book by the 14th Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler, a psychiatrist who posed questions to the Dalai Lama. Cutler quotes the Dalai Lama at length, providing context and describing some details of the settings in which the interviews took place, as well as adding his own reflections on issues raised.[1]

The book explores training the human outlook that alters perception. The concepts that the purpose of life is happiness, that happiness is determined more by the state of one’s mind than by one’s external conditions, circumstances, or events—at least once one’s basic survival needs are met and that happiness can be achieved through the systematic training of our hearts and minds.[2][3]

Brain Ruls

Brain Rules was written by John Medina, a developmental molecular biologist.[1] The full name of the book is Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School. The book has tried to explain how the brain works in twelve perspectives: exercise, survival, wiring, attention, short-term memory, long-term memory, sleep, stress, multisensory perception, vision, gender and exploration.[2] Each chapter demonstrates things scientists already know about the brain, and things we as people do that can affect how our brain will develop.

The Power of Habit

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business is a book by Charles Duhigg, a New York Times reporter, published in February 2012 by Random House. It explores the science behind habit creation and reformation. The book reached the best seller list for The New York Times, Amazon.com, and USA Today.[1][2][3][4] It was long listed for the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award in 2012.

The 5 AM Club

The 5 AM Club will walk you through:

• How great geniuses, business titans and the world’s wisest people start their mornings to produce astonishing achievements

• A little-known formula you can use instantly to wake up early feeling inspired, focused and flooded with a fiery drive to get the most out of each day

• A step-by-step method to protect the quietest hours of daybreak so you have time for exercise, self-renewal and personal growth

• A neuroscience-based practice proven to help make it easy to rise while most people are sleeping, giving you precious time for yourself to think, express your creativity and begin the day peacefully instead of being rushed

• “Insider-only” tactics to defend your gifts, talents and dreams against digital distraction and trivial diversions so you enjoy fortune, influence and a magnificent impact on the world

Steal Like an Artist

Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative is a book on coming up with creative ideas written by Austin Kleon and published in 2012 from Workman Publishing. The book, has since then become a New York Times Bestseller. Kleon presents himself as a young writer and artist emphasizing that creativity is everywhere and is for everyone. In his own words, “You don’t need to be a genius, you just need to be yourself”. Kleon points out that no artist’s work is ever completely original, and that trying to be completely original will daunt an artist and eventually smothers his creativity. He suggests artists embrace the inevitability of influence, to celebrate living outside of a vacuum, to relax, and have fun with their art. Beyond that, he also goes on to offer tips on how to stay focused, upbeat, and be receptive to incoming inspiration.

Start With why

Simon starts with a fundamental question: Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their success over and over?

People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers had little in common, but they all started with WHY. They realized that people won’t truly buy into a product, service, movement, or idea until they understand the WHY behind it.

Start With Why shows that the leaders who’ve had the greatest influence in the world all think, act, and communicate the same way — and it’s the opposite of what everyone else does. Sinek calls this powerful idea The Golden Circle, and it provides a framework upon which organizations can be built, movements can be led, and people can be inspired. And it all starts with WHY.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Rich Dad Poor Dad is a 1997 book written by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It advocates the importance of financial literacy (financial education), financial independence and building wealth through investing in assets, real estate investing, starting and owning businesses, as well as increasing one’s financial intelligence (financial IQ).

Rich Dad Poor Dad is written in the style of a set of parables, ostensibly based on Kiyosaki’s life.[1] The titular “rich dad” is purportedly his friend’s father who accumulated wealth due to entrepreneurship and savvy investing, while the “poor dad” is claimed to be Kiyosaki’s own father who he says worked hard all his life but never obtained financial security. However, no one has ever proven that Rich Dad, the man who supposedly gave Kiyosaki all his advice for wealthy living, ever existed. Nor has anyone ever documented any vast reserves of wealth earned by Kiyosaki prior to the publication of Rich Dad Poor Dad in 1997.

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari was published in 1999 by Harper Collins Publishers, and has sold more than three million copies as of 2013.[1] A recent translation to Dogri language was done by Champa Sharma.[2] Sharma also wrote several other books in the series, such as The Secret Letters Of The Monk Who Sold His Red FerrariLeadership Wisdom from the Monk Who Sold His FerrariDiscover Your Destiny with the Monk who sold his Ferrari and Family Wisdom from the Monk Who Sold His Ferrari.[3]

who will cry when you die

The book is divided into 101 full chapters. Each chapter offers solutions and suggestions to face some of the difficult problems of life and develop one’s personality and personal skills. Some of the suggestions mentioned in this book are— carrying goal cards, learning from good movies, seeing a day as an entire life, learning how to walk, importance of planting trees etc.

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